Object ID
2002.34.4.F
Object Name
Toga
Material
Rayon
Object Entities
Object Description
Off white, full length dress/toga. No sleeves and is a one shoulder strap. The strap is hooked with a metal clip and there is a decorative bow in the shoulder which is blue and silver and embroidered with the Greek Key. The waist is sinched in with sting and also has belt loops. The remainder of the dress is plain till about eight inches from the bottom where theres is another blue and silver Greek Key strip that goes around the whole dress. Below that strip is plain till the end of the dress. Few dirt stains at the skirt of the dress.
Origin
Other pieces in the accession are costumes from the Independence Day Parade so it is safe to assume this would have been worn the same. Greek Independence Day, national holiday celebrated annually in Greece,as well as around the world, on March 25, commemorating the start of the War of Greek Independence in 1821. It coincides with the Greek Orthodox Church’s celebration of the Annunciation to the Theotokos, when the Archangel Gabriel appeared to Mary and told her that she would bear the son of God. Greece had been part of the Ottoman Empire since 1453. The Greek revolt was precipitated on March 25, 1821, when Bishop Germanos of Patras raised the flag of revolution over the Monastery of Agia Lavra in the Peloponnese. The cry “Freedom or death” became the motto of the revolution. The Greeks experienced early successes on the battlefield, including the capture of Athens in June 1822, but infighting ensued. By 1827 Athens and most of the Greek isles had been recaptured by the Turks. Just as the revolution appeared to be on the verge of failure, Great Britain, France, and Russia intervened in the conflict. The Greek struggle had elicited strong sympathy in Europe, and many leading intellectuals had promoted the Greek cause, including the English poet Lord Byron. At the naval Battle of Navarino, the combined British, French, and Russian forces destroyed an Ottoman-Egyptian fleet. The revolution ended in 1829 when the Treaty of Edirne established an independent Greek state. In celebration of Greek Independence Day, towns and villages throughout Greece hold a school flag parade, during which schoolchildren march in traditional Greek costume and carry Greek flags. There is also an armed forces parade in Athens.
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Citation
Toga, National Hellenic Museum, https://collections.nationalhellenicmuseum.org/Detail/objects/6847. Accessed 11/29/20.